We have been sent!

 

Friday of the Fourth Week of Lent

Wisdom 2:1, 12-22

John 7:1-2, 10, 25-30

All School Mass

 

Pick 12 volunteers from the students. Have them gather around me for instructions.

Would the Accreditation Team please stand?

Give instructions to the 12 volunteers: I am going to send you to go to the members of the Accreditation Team and introduce yourself, tell them what grade you are in and welcome them to our school.

 

What just happened? Answer:

 

Who sent you to do this? Answer:

 

There are lots of times that we are sent to do things, we were sent to school today, and we were sent to church today. We are sent to do many things, and we do them quite easily. Our readings today speak about Jesus being sent by his heavenly Father. Because Jesus claims to be sent by his heavenly Father, there are people who do not like him and they want to avoid him and even kill him.

 

In our first reading, it talks about one being sent, who will be obnoxious to them, the people do not like this person being sent. That want this person to go away.

 

In our Gospel, Jesus cries out in the temple, “You know me, and you know where I am from, but you do not know the one who sent me.

 

My friends in Christ, Jesus has been sent to us in this Eucharist and our Catholic School. Once we encounter Christ who has been sent to us, our lives are forever changed, and we are to live differently than the rest of the world. Sometimes we will know hardship for standing up for the truth, because of Jesus being sent to us.

 

During this Lenten season may we come to know Jesus Christ who has been sent to save us.  

 

 

Who do we need to intervene for in prayer?

 

Thursday of the Fourth Week of Lent

Exodus 32:7-14

John 5:31-47

 

Who are those people that God has entrusted to us and we need to intercede to God for them? Who are those people that need for us to intercede for them today? Our readings bring us into contact with the reality that our prayers can and will help those we pray for this day.

 

In our first reading, Moses has gotten the bad news that the people have fallen away once again and are worshipping a golden calf. The Lord is outraged and wants totally to destroy the people he calls his own. Moses had the enduring task of representing God to the people but also representing the people to God. Moses intervenes to God to relent his punishment about his people, and God does relent.

 

In our Gospel, Jesus seems to be on trial for claiming himself to be one with God the Father. Because a person could not legally testify on their own behalf, Jesus testifies to his witnesses. He says the following people have intervened on his behalf. First Jesus says that God has intervened on his behalf, then he says, that John the Baptist has intervened on his behalf, and then finally Jesus says that all he has accomplished in the name of his Father testifies to who he is. In the end, the people still do not accept Jesus for who he is even as all these people and things have been given intervening on his behalf.

 

Do we know that Jesus Christ is intervening on our behalf today? Let us in great prayer intervene for those who need our prayers this day?

 

Do want to be healed?

 

Tuesday of the Fourth Week of Lent

Ezekiel 47:1-9, 12

John 5:1-16

 

In our Gospel, Jesus asks, “Do you want to be healed?” That seems like an obvious question to a man who has been waiting to be healed for 38 years! Jesus heals the man, and he comes to believe.

 

Do we want to be healed? What do we need to be healed from today? I want to be healed from doubt and fear that trips me up in believing that God is not near. I want to be healed from sexual attractions that steal my attention away from the truth of Jesus Christ. I want to be healed from hearts that I know are broken, hurting and lost, and I pray for them to fall into the arms of God.

 

I want to be healed like the story in our first reading which tells of a trickle of water that begins at the temple, and as it flows it becomes a raging river, and as it flows, it heals and brings to new life everything in its path. That is what I want to know!

 

Lent is about being healed; it is about knowing the loving and saving grace of God. May we know this comfort today?

How do we know God’s love?

 Fourth Sunday of Lent

I Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 10-13

Ephesians 5: 8-14

John 9:1-41

(Standing up top in sanctuary) Can everyone see me? (Step down on Floor) Can you see me know? Ok, you just passed the physical sight test part of this homily. We all have been blessed with the gift of seeing, may we be grateful to God for our gift of sight. Our readings challenge us to a different seeing, and that is seeing with our hearts. I know asking “to see with our hearts” I probably just lost most of the men because we hear the word “heart” and we immediately think we are talking about feelings and all that goes with that and that is just not our style! Work with me! Seeing with our heart is a God thing! To see with our heart means to see, as God sees, to be open to God leading us, to try and to eliminate all of our blind spots, to be honest with ourselves, and people of integrity and faith. 

Let us look at three areas of seeing with our hearts and clearing away our blind spots. How do we see ourselves today? When we see ourselves do we like ourselves or do we dislike ourselves? What part of ourselves do we see that we will not let others see? Why? Is there something we do that we see, that needs to change, but we don’t? Why are we hanging onto this?  

When we see with our hearts and see blind spots what do we see when we look at other people? Who are those that we see that we like? Who are the people we see, but we keep them at a distance? Are the blind spots because of race, color of skin, or political agenda?  

When we with our hearts and see blind spots, what do we see when we look at God? Do we like God or dislike God? If God sees us for who we are today, why are we not trying to be better, in the eyes of God?  

Our first reading would have been a lot shorter if a woman was doing the choosing, but then we would not have this beautiful story of choosing a new king for Israel. Samuel the prophet is sent to Bethlehem to the house of Jesse to choose a king from his sons. Samuel and Jesse are God fearing man, but the problem is they look for a new king as men do, with their physical eyes, and not with their hearts. God does not see any to his liking in the first seven even though seven is a perfect number. Jesse has one more son, who he saw as so insignificant and not worthy of inviting that he left him out in the field. God sees in the heart of David and Samuel anoints him King.  

In our second reading, Paul understands what it means to see into his heart and clearing away the blind spots, but it took a bright light and being knocked down to the ground before he did get it. Paul is encouraging us to “see with our hearts” by always walking to the light of Christ and cutting away anything that leads us to darkness.  

In our Gospel, we hear about the healing of a blind man. What I love about the story is the blind man does not ask to be healed, it is all Jesus. Jesus is seeing into his heart and heals him of his physical blindness. The man is not sure who healed him, but he slowly begins to see with his heart and comes to know that it was Jesus who healed him.  

My friends in Christ, we need to see more clearly with our hearts, the way God sees us, and clear away the blind spots in our lives. Right now we need to see with our hearts, to be able to see simple bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ. May we live this week, seeing with our hearts and clear away the blind spots so we may see as God sees and live.  

 

What are our blind spots?

 

Fourth Sunday of Lent

I Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 10-13

Ephesians 5: 8-14

John 9:1-41  

(Standing up top in sanctuary) Can everyone see me? (Step down on Floor) Can you see me know? Ok, you just passed the physical sight test part of this homily. We all have been blessed with the gift of seeing, may we be grateful to God for our gift of sight. Our readings challenge us to a different seeing, and that is seeing with our hearts. I know asking “to see with our hearts” I probably just lost most of the men because we hear the word “heart” and we immediately think we are talking about feelings and all that goes with that and that is just not our style! Work with me! Seeing with our heart is a God thing! To see with our heart means to see, as God sees, to be open to God leading us, to try and to eliminate all of our blind spots, to be honest with ourselves, and people of integrity and faith.  

Let us look at three areas of seeing with our hearts and clearing away our blind spots. How do we see ourselves today? When we see ourselves do we like ourselves or do we dislike ourselves? What part of ourselves do we see that we will not let others see? Why? Is there something we do that we see, that needs to change, but we don’t? Why are we hanging onto this?  

When we see with our hearts and see blind spots what do we see when we look at other people? Who are those that we see that we like? Who are the people we see, but we keep them at a distance? Are the blind spots because of race, color of skin, or political agenda?  

When we with our hearts and see blind spots, what do we see when we look at God? Do we like God or dislike God? If God sees us for who we are today, why are we not trying to be better, in the eyes of God?  

Our first reading would have been a lot shorter if a woman was doing the choosing, but then we would not have this beautiful story of choosing a new king for Israel. Samuel the prophet is sent to Bethlehem to the house of Jesse to choose a king from his sons. Samuel and Jesse are God fearing man, but the problem is they look for a new king as men do, with their physical eyes, and not with their hearts. God does not see any to his liking in the first seven even though seven is a perfect number. Jesse has one more son, who he saw as so insignificant and not worthy of inviting that he left him out in the field. God sees in the heart of David and Samuel anoints him King.  

In our second reading, Paul understands what it means to see into his heart and clearing away the blind spots, but it took a bright light and being knocked down to the ground before he did get it. Paul is encouraging us to “see with our hearts” by always walking to the light of Christ and cutting away anything that leads us to darkness.  

In our Gospel, we hear about the healing of a blind man. What I love about the story is the blind man does not ask to be healed, it is all Jesus. Jesus is seeing into his heart and heals him of his physical blindness. The man is not sure who healed him, but he slowly begins to see with his heart and comes to know that it was Jesus who healed him.  

My friends in Christ, we need to see more clearly with our hearts, the way God sees us, and clear away the blind spots in our lives. Right now we need to see with our hearts, to be able to see simple bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ. May we live this week, seeing with our hearts and clear away the blind spots so we may see as God sees and live.  

What are our blind spots?

 

Fourth Sunday of Lent

I Samuel 16:1, 6-7, 10-13

Ephesians 5: 8-14

John 9:1-41

 

(Standing up top in sanctuary) Can everyone see me? (Step down on Floor) Can you see me know? Ok, you just passed the physical sight test part of this homily. We all have been blessed with the gift of seeing, may we be grateful to God for our gift of sight. Our readings challenge us to a different seeing, and that is seeing with our hearts. I know asking “to see with our hearts” I probably just lost most of the men because we hear the word “heart” and we immediately think we are talking about feelings and all that goes with that and that is just not our style! Work with me! Seeing with our heart is a God thing! To see with our heart means to see, as God sees, to be open to God leading us, to try and to eliminate all of our blind spots, to be honest with ourselves, and people of integrity and faith.  

Let us look at three areas of seeing with our hearts and clearing away our blind spots. How do we see ourselves today? When we see ourselves do we like ourselves or do we dislike ourselves? What part of ourselves do we see that we will not let others see? Why? Is there something we do that we see, that needs to change, but we don’t? Why are we hanging onto this?  

When we see with our hearts and see blind spots what do we see when we look at other people? Who are those that we see that we like? Who are the people we see, but we keep them at a distance? Are the blind spots because of race, color of skin, or political agenda?  

When we with our hearts and see blind spots, what do we see when we look at God? Do we like God or dislike God? If God sees us for who we are today, why are we not trying to be better, in the eyes of God?  

Our first reading would have been a lot shorter if a woman was doing the choosing, but then we would not have this beautiful story of choosing a new king for Israel. Samuel the prophet is sent to Bethlehem to the house of Jesse to choose a king from his sons. Samuel and Jesse are God fearing man, but the problem is they look for a new king as men do, with their physical eyes, and not with their hearts. God does not see any to his liking in the first seven even though seven is a perfect number. Jesse has one more son, who he saw as so insignificant and not worthy of inviting that he left him out in the field. God sees in the heart of David and Samuel anoints him King.  

In our second reading, Paul understands what it means to see into his heart and clearing away the blind spots, but it took a bright light and being knocked down to the ground before he did get it. Paul is encouraging us to “see with our hearts” by always walking to the light of Christ and cutting away anything that leads us to darkness.  

In our Gospel, we hear about the healing of a blind man. What I love about the story is the blind man does not ask to be healed, it is all Jesus. Jesus is seeing into his heart and heals him of his physical blindness. The man is not sure who healed him, but he slowly begins to see with his heart and comes to know that it was Jesus who healed him.  

My friends in Christ, we need to see more clearly with our hearts, the way God sees us, and clear away the blind spots in our lives. Right now we need to see with our hearts, to be able to see simple bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ. May we live this week, seeing with our hearts and clear away the blind spots so we may see as God sees and live.  

How do we love God?

 

Friday of the Third Week of Lent

Hosea 14: 2-10

Mark 12:28 – 34

All School Mass

 

If someone was to ask you, “What is the greatest Catholic School in the Diocese?” What would be your answer?

Answer – St. Patrick’s of Parnell.

 

Why is St. Patrick the greatest?

 

If someone was to ask you, “Who is the greatest Catholic School principal in the diocese?” What would be your answer?

Answer – Mr. Czarnopys.

 

Why is Mr. Czarnopys the greatest?

 

If someone was to ask you, “Where would I find the greatest Catholic School teachers in the diocese? What would be your answer?

 

Why are the teachers at St. Patrick the greatest?

 

If someone was to ask you, “What is the greatest of all the Commandments?” What would be your answer?

Answer – “To love the Lord our God with all of your heart, with all of your soul, with all of your mind, and with all of our strength. And to love your neighbor as yourself.”

 

Why is it this the greatest of all the Commandments?

 

To love God and others is the greatest of all the commandments because God has loved us, and we need to rest in knowing that God loves us, no matter what we think of ourselves. We show our love for God by loving others. Love of God and love of others cannot be separated. We say we love God, but now think of the person we struggle to love. This is how much we love God, by our Gospel today. Not loving others is not loving God. What we do or do not do for others is how we do or do not do for God. This is what we must strive to do and be.

 

May we examine our lives this Lenten season and may we love God more today by showing love to others.